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Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (NGS Panel and Copy Number Analysis + mtDNA)

CPT: 81448, 81460, 81465

Genes Assessed


      Specimen Requirements


      Specimen

      Blood | Extracted DNA | Cultured Fibroblasts | Muscle | Buccal Cells


      Volume

      Blood: Draw blood in a lavender top EDTA tube, Sample Stability: 5-7 days, Preferred volume: 4 ml, Minimum volume: 2 ml, DO NOT FREEZE. Extracted DNA: From leukocytes, muscle, or fibroblasts: Preferred quantity: 1 microgram, Minimum quantity: 800 nanograms. Genomic DNA should be eluted in sterile Dnase/Rnase free water or TE. The A260:A280 ratio should be 1.8-2.0. Cultured Fibroblasts: Two T-25 flasks of fibroblasts, preferably ~90% confluent. TAT will be extended by 7-14 days if cells are not confluent upon arrival. Muscle: 50-75 milligrams muscle snap frozen in liquid nitrogen and maintained at -80°Celsius or below. Buccal Cells: One buccal swab should be used for collection. Do not discard solution in collection tube. Follow collection instructions supplied. Stability at ambient temperature is 60 days.


      Container

      Blood: Lavender-Top (EDTA) Tube, Buccal Swab from MNG Kit, Tissue or Extracted DNA: Sterile screw capped vial, Cultured cells: T25 flask


      Collection

      Blood: Specimens should be shipped overnight in a secure container at room temperature. Extracted DNA: Should be shipped overnight at room temperature. If previously frozen, DNA can be shipped in an insulated container with wet or dry ice. Cultured Fibroblasts: T-25 flasks containing fibroblasts should be shipped in an insulated container at room temperature. Flasks should be completely filled with media and cells should be ~90% confluent. Fibroblast samples must be certified free from Mycoplasma. MNG is able to perform this service for a small charge (TC05). For NGS panels, TAT will be extended by 7-14 days if cells are not confluent upon arrival. Muscle: Samples should be shipped frozen in an insulated container with 5-7 lbs. dry ice, overnight. Buccal cells: Should be shipped overnight in a secure container at room temperature.


      Storage Instructions

      Blood - ship ASAP, but stable up to 5 days post-collection at room temperature. DO NOT FREEZE; Swab - 60 day post-collection room temperature stability; DNA - ship at room temperature after extraction; Fibroblasts - ship flask in insulated container at room temp or refigerated; Muscle - ship in insulated container with 5-7 lbs of dry ice


      Stability Requirements

      Room Temperature: Blood - 5 days, Swab - 60 days, DNA - 30 days, Muscle - 0 days, Fibroblasts - 2-3 days; Refrigerated: Blood - 5 days, Swab - 60 days, DNA - 30 days, Muscle - 0 days, Fibroblasts - 2-3 days; Frozen: Blood - DO NOT FREEZE, Swab - 60 days, DNA - Indefinitely, Muscle - Indefinitely, Fibroblasts - Indefinitely; Freeze/Thaw: None


      Causes for Rejection

      Extracted DNA A260:A280 ratio of outside of 1.8-2.0 range; Frozen blood EDTA tube; Thawed and/or fatty muscle sample; Insufficient buccal cell collection


      Test Details


      Use

      Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) hereditary neuropathy refers to a group of progressive disorders characterized by a chronic motor and sensory polyneuropathy. CMT neuropathies are the most common cause of hereditary neuropathy. CMT neuropathies are also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies (HMSN), because they are characterized predominately by motor and sensory symptoms. The affected individual typically has distal muscle weakness and atrophy often associated with mild to moderate sensory loss, depressed tendon reflexes, and high-arched feet. CMT hereditary neuropathy syndrome can be inherited in an autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked manner. CMT disease usually becomes apparent in adolescence or early adulthood, but onset may occur anytime from early childhood through late adulthood. Symptoms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease vary in severity, even among members of the same family. Typically, the earliest symptoms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease involve balance difficulties, clumsiness, and muscle weakness in the feet. Affected individuals may have foot abnormalities such as high arches (pes cavus), flat feet (pes planus), or hammer toes. Affected individuals often have difficulty flexing the foot or walking on the heel of the foot. As the disease progresses, muscles in the lower legs usually weaken, but leg and foot problems rarely require the use of a wheelchair. Affected individuals may also develop weakness in the hands, causing difficulty with daily activities such as writing, fastening buttons, and turning doorknobs. People with this disorder typically experience a decreased sensitivity to touch, heat, and cold in the feet and lower legs, but occasionally feel aching or burning sensations. In some cases, affected individuals experience gradual hearing loss, deafness, or loss of vision.


      Methodology

      Next-Generation Sequencing


      Recommended MNG Kits

      SINGLE Blood Genetic Testing, Buccal Swab Genetic Testing


      Z-Code

      ZB85J